Killing the Messenger

The INSI Global Inquiry into the causes of journalist deaths around the world was the most comprehensive conducted at that time. It covered all deaths between 1996 and mid-2006 and took two years to complete.

The inquiry, under the chairmanship of Richard Sambrook, BBC Global news director, was launched formally on 3 May 2005, World Press Freedom Day. It comprised data research and interviews with international correspondents as well as regional journalists in Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Latin America.

Its conclusions were shocking. More than 1,000 news media personnel had died trying to report the news over the decade - almost two deaths every week. Only one in four were killed covering wars while most died in peacetime in their own countries. In two-thirds of the cases the killers were never identified.

The report, called Killing the Messenger, was presented in London on 9 March 2007. It made several key recommendations, to international bodies, governments, security forces, news organisations and journalists themselves which would, if acted upon, reduce the death toll.

Click here to read the original Killing the Messenger report

INSI would like to thank Cardiff University School of Journalism, Media & Cultural Studies for the research and the compilation of data. Since its publication, INSI has been working with Cardiff to produce annual Killing the Messenger reports. Below is a list of the publications to date.

Click here to read Killing the Messenger 2016 (PDF)

Click here to read Killing the Messenger 2015 (PDF) 

Click here to read Killing the Messenger 2014 (PDF)

Click here to read Killing the Messenger 2013 (PDF)

Click here to read Killing the Messenger 2012 (PDF)

Click here to read Killing the Messenger 2011 (PDF)

Click here to read Killing the Messenger 2010 (PDF)

Click here to read Killing the Messenger 2009 (PDF)

Click here to read Killing the Messenger 2008 (PDF)